driving instructor

It’s such an exciting time in your life! You’re finally legally able to take control of a car and learn to drive! You’ve been through the driver’s education course and California driving school. You’ve taken the written test at the DMV. Your required six months with your permit has begun. Now all that is left is to complete your 50 hours of behind the wheel training. But who do you choose to accompany you for that 50 hours of training?

A Significant Other?

You and your significant other alone in a car together sounds like a dream, right? Wrong. That’s a dream for when you have your full license at age 18. That’s when it will be legal for you to drive minors. Your honey-bear isn’t old enough to teach you, and the distraction of having them around won’t help you learn. Look for some other options.


A Grandparent?

Completing a few hours with a grandparent may seem like a good idea. Depending on their temperament, driving with a grandparent could go one of two ways. First, they might not be too harsh on you, which seems like the best-case scenario. However, you want them to be observant and tell you when you’re doing something wrong. You need that feedback so that you can be the best driver possible when you do finally get your license. They might also go the exact other way. Your grandparents were raised in a different time, and they can be set in their ways. That doesn’t always make them patient teachers. The last thing you want is to take a turn too fast while driving with them. Then you’ll be hearing all about how you almost gave your grandfather a heart attack for the rest of time.


An Older Sibling?


Maybe you have a brother or sister that’s old enough to legally supervise you. (They’d have to be 25 years old, by the way). This seems like a great solution. You get your 50 hours done and you get to hang out with your cool older sibling! On the one hand, they might be more familiar with the material. After all, they did the same thing much more recently than your parents did. On the other hand, that means they have much less experience. People in the middle of their twenties also aren’t always known for their responsibility or excellent teaching methods either. You don’t want to be learning to drive with someone who is only giving the task half their attention. Especially if the other half of their attention is on completing their own online traffic school.


A Parent?


Listen, we all know learning to drive with one of your parents sounds lame. Driving is supposed to be fun, right? Spending a total of 50 hours in a small space with a concerned parent is the polar opposite of fun. Also, if you don’t both have the right attitude, this could be a great way to destroy a good relationship.

However, your parents have been planning how best to teach you to drive probably since you were born. They’ve given the subject countless hours of thought. They are more prepared to do this than anyone else in your life. In fact, if you don’t let them, they’ll probably be relieved, yes, but also a little let down. If you come from a single-parent family, your decision is already made for you. If you have both parents around, pick the safest driver and hit the road! If they’re both pretty great, go with the most patient. Mistakes are a part of learning. You’ll want to choose the person who understands that best. Alternately, split the time between them and give them 25 hours each. It would be good to get another perspective, and they won’t feel like you’re picking favorites.


Once you’ve completed your 50 hours, you’ll be ready for the next step! Have fun on the road!